Where to begin…

WEDNESDAY

7 o’clock and were on our way out of Sandbach down onto M6 and the mammoth drive that awaits. My dad managed to keep his cool for the most part in the relentless heat. Managed to avoid a lot of queueing which was good but still ended up crawling at a snails pace through Shepton Mallet. After about seven hours spent on the road we arrived at the drop-off point where the eight of us boarded a short coach journey to the festival. Arriving was probably easily the worst part, having to carry all you bags in the mid-afternoon heat to look for somewhere to camp is no way to start the festival. But after severe amounts of moaning we found a nice little spot next to the toilets which were next to the dance village. Most of Wednesday for me at least involved exploring the sight and just sitting and chilling up by the top of the Park area. Most of this is irrlevent

THURSDAY

Suppose this is the day Glasto actually begins. After little sleep (because of those bloody Welsh guys in the tent behind us) a few of use went of down to watch Where The Wild Things Are. It was cancelled. So we went back to the tent and came back for Ponyo at the Cinema tent. Ponyo not Miyazaki’s finest work but a fun film non the less. Would have been better if I hadn’t of needed the loo all the way through it. Music then began later in the day at the Queens Head stage. Two Door Cinema Club were the first band we saw. Well heard, the place was packed but managed to get down the front from then after. Watched worst band of the festival Chapel Club. Could music possibly sound anymore boring and contrived. Micachu was very good, so good that her drummer proposed towards the end of the set. Local Natives ended the night a band who have really grown since seeing them for the first time on a cold Sunday night in Stoke.

FRIDAY

Started off a little slow not that Rolf Harris wasn’t brilliant/hilarious and all but there just seemed little on elsewhere. Tune-Yards weren’t bad and neither were The Stranglers. However earlier in the day I received a text saying that Thom Yorke will be playing a secret set up at The Park. This had to be investigated so off I went to the Info booth up there and asked. Apparently he was. Risks must be taken I thought to myself so after watching a rather good Phoenix i wandered up to The Park to see Local Natives once again who sadly said exactly the same things inbetween songs as they had the previous night. The came The Big Pink who were too loud for my liking, thank god no one I know saw me singing along to ‘Dominoes’. But the came possibly one of the greatest moments of my life, as soon as the various pieces of equipment and instruments came out I knew what was coming next. After a short wait Michael Eavis arrives on stage announcing the pair who were about to grace the stage as two superstars yet still refusing to say who was about to arrive.

“Hello I’m Thomas Yorke” he says before taking a seat next to his piano to whack out a few tunes from solo LP ‘The Eraser’ starting with the aforementioned track. Don’t think I’d heard Glastonbury this quite all weekend, everyone around hooked by his every word as if they were a group of school children listening to their teacher reading some sort of marvellous story. He continued to play through tracks from ‘The Eraser’ even messing up ‘Black Swan’ in which he called himself a ‘fucking amateur’. The magic however really began when Radiohead band mate Johnny Greenwood arrived on stage. Every song played felt special and intimate from then on in, ‘Weird Fishes’ even more magical than on ‘In Rainbows’. Then the hits just continued flowing from ‘Pyramid Song’ through to ‘Street Spirit’ everyone around totally engrossed and captivated by what was being played out before them. Personal highlights for me were ‘Idioteque’ in which Thom took to the piano and played it on that, just sweet. But you can’t beat ‘Karma Police’ really can you. Don’t think I’ve ever heard a sing-a-long that loud before, so loud that Thom decided to carry on playing when the crowd wanted more of it. The band closed on ‘Street Spirit’ to a rapturous applause and as people left the park area the mass sing-a-long continued. So good to know that we could possibly have another Radiohead album out by the end of the year. They’ve been away for far too long.

I paced it back to the Other Stage following this with a grin from ear to ear to try and catch the end of Hot Chip and from what I saw they looked brilliant. Of the three songs played it looked like they’d taken another step towards to big time with songs like ‘I Feel Better’ sounding epic as the sunset over the festival. Next up the band I was most looking forward to seeing of the whole festival. If anyone knows how to kick start a party then it’s The Flaming Lips, consistently one of the best live bands on the planet and a brilliant alternative to the averageness that is Gorrilaz headlining the Pyramid. So the madness began with Wayne Coyne running around the crowd in a giant hamster ball, whats not to love? Confetti and balloons showered the audience from above with Wayne screaming gibberish down a megaphone. After a few songs from recent double LP ‘Embryonic’ the awesome tunes that the band are famous for begin to kick in. Starting with ‘She Don’t Use Jelly’ featuring dancing Caterpillars and Frogs of course.  The ever enthusiastic Coyne continued leading the crowd through a set of old and new. Favourite for me being the supremely awesome ‘Do You Realise?’ a song that could be considered even more poignant at somewhere like Glastonbury. By this point and the end of what was an unbelievable day let alone performance from The Flaming Lips I decided to head back to the tent where me and my friends sat and discussed what a brilliant day we all had. And by 2.oo (ish) we were all in bed dreaming of what would lye ahead for the rest of the weekend.

James

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